본문 바로가기
나머지/영어

[TED] The single biggest reason why startups succeed

by 무늬만학생 2017. 3. 14.
반응형

내가 보려고 올리는거 ㅎ 


Bill Gross:

The single biggest reason why startups succeed

TED2015 · 6:40 · Filmed Mar 2015


출처: http://www.ted.com/talks/bill_gross_the_single_biggest_reason_why_startups_succeed/transcript?language=en


전체

0:11

I'm really excited to share with you some findings that really surprise me about what makes companies succeed the most, what factors actually matter the most for startup success.


0:24

I believe that the startup organization is one of the greatest forms to make the world a better place. If you take a group of people with the right equity incentives and organize them in a startup, you can unlock human potential in a way never before possible. You get them to achieve unbelievable things.


0:42

But if the startup organization is so great, why do so many fail? That's what I wanted to find out. I wanted to find out what actually matters most for startup success.


0:51

And I wanted to try to be systematic about it, avoid some of my instincts and maybe misperceptions I have from so many companies I've seen over the years.


0:59

I wanted to know this because I've been starting businesses since I was 12 years old when I sold candy at the bus stop in junior high school, to high school, when I made solar energy devices, to college, when I made loudspeakers. And when I graduated from college, I started software companies. And 20 years ago, I started Idealab, and in the last 20 years, we started more than 100 companies, many successes, and many big failures. We learned a lot from those failures.


1:22

So I tried to look across what factors accounted the most for company success and failure. So I looked at these five. First, the idea. I used to think that the idea was everything. I named my company Idealab for how much I worship the "aha!" moment when you first come up with the idea. But then over time, I came to think that maybe the team, the execution, adaptability, that mattered even more than the idea.


1:45

I never thought I'd be quoting boxer Mike Tyson on the TED stage, but he once said, "Everybody has a plan, until they get punched in the face." (Laughter) And I think that's so true about business as well. So much about a team's execution is its ability to adapt to getting punched in the face by the customer. The customer is the true reality. And that's why I came to think that the team maybe was the most important thing.


2:11

Then I started looking at the business model. Does the company have a very clear path generating customer revenues? That started rising to the top in my thinking about maybe what mattered most for success.


2:20

Then I looked at the funding. Sometimes companies received intense amounts of funding. Maybe that's the most important thing?


2:26

And then of course, the timing. Is the idea way too early and the world's not ready for it? Is it early, as in, you're in advance and you have to educate the world? Is it just right? Or is it too late, and there's already too many competitors?


2:38

So I tried to look very carefully at these five factors across many companies. And I looked across all 100 Idealab companies, and 100 non-Idealab companies to try and come up with something scientific about it.


2:48

So first, on these Idealab companies, the top five companies ? Citysearch, CarsDirect, GoTo, NetZero, Tickets.com ? those all became billion-dollar successes. And the five companies on the bottom ? Z.com, Insider Pages, MyLife, Desktop Factory, Peoplelink ? we all had high hopes for, but didn't succeed.


3:05

So I tried to rank across all of those attributes how I felt those companies scored on each of those dimensions. And then for non-Idealab companies, I looked at wild successes, like Airbnb and Instagram and Uber and Youtube and LinkedIn.


3:19

And some failures: Webvan, Kozmo, Pets.com Flooz and Friendster. The bottom companies had intense funding, they even had business models in some cases, but they didn't succeed. I tried to look at what factors actually accounted the most for success and failure across all of these companies, and the results really surprised me.


3:36

The number one thing was timing. Timing accounted for 42 percent of the difference between success and failure. Team and execution came in second, and the idea, the differentiability of the idea, the uniqueness of the idea, that actually came in third.


3:50

Now, this isn't absolutely definitive, it's not to say that the idea isn't important, but it very much surprised me that the idea wasn't the most important thing. Sometimes it mattered more when it was actually timed.


4:01

The last two, business model and funding, made sense to me actually. I think business model makes sense to be that low because you can start out without a business model and add one later if your customers are demanding what you're creating. And funding, I think as well, if you're underfunded at first but you're gaining traction, especially in today's age, it's very, very easy to get intense funding.


4:20

So now let me give you some specific examples about each of these. So take a wild success like Airbnb that everybody knows about. Well, that company was famously passed on by many smart investors because people thought, "No one's going to rent out a space in their home to a stranger." Of course, people proved that wrong. But one of the reasons it succeeded, aside from a good business model, a good idea, great execution, is the timing.


4:41

That company came out right during the height of the recession when people really needed extra money, and that maybe helped people overcome their objection to renting out their own home to a stranger.


4:50

Same thing with Uber. Uber came out, incredible company, incredible business model, great execution, too. But the timing was so perfect for their need to get drivers into the system. Drivers were looking for extra money; it was very, very important.


5:02

Some of our early successes, Citysearch, came out when people needed web pages. GoTo.com, which we announced actually at TED in 1998, was when companies were looking for cost-effective ways to get traffic. We thought the idea was so great, but actually, the timing was probably maybe more important. And then some of our failures. We started a company called Z.com, it was an online entertainment company. We were so excited about it ? we raised enough money, we had a great business model, we even signed incredibly great Hollywood talent to join the company. But broadband penetration was too low in 1999-2000. It was too hard to watch video content online, you had to put codecs in your browser and do all this stuff, and the company eventually went out of business in 2003.


5:38

Just two years later, when the codec problem was solved by Adobe Flash and when broadband penetration crossed 50 percent in America, YouTube was perfectly timed. Great idea, but unbelievable timing. In fact, YouTube didn't even have a business model when it first started. It wasn't even certain that that would work out. But that was beautifully, beautifully timed.


5:58

So what I would say, in summary, is execution definitely matters a lot. The idea matters a lot. But timing might matter even more. And the best way to really assess timing is to really look at whether consumers are really ready for what you have to offer them. And to be really, really honest about it, not be in denial about any results that you see, because if you have something you love, you want to push it forward, but you have to be very, very honest about that factor on timing.


6:22

As I said earlier, I think startups can change the world and make the world a better place. I hope some of these insights can maybe help you have a slightly higher success ratio, and thus make something great come to the world that wouldn't have happened otherwise.


6:34

Thank you very much, you've been a great audience.


6:36

(Applause)



0:11

저는 오늘 여러분들과 함께 스타트업의 성공에 가장 중요한 요소가 무엇인지 무엇이 회사를 성공하게 도와주는지에 대한 몇가지 놀라운 연구조사들을 공유하고자 합니다.

0:24

저는 스타트업이 이 세상을 발전시킬 형태 중 하나라고 믿습니다. 만약 우리가 올바른 성과급 시스템을 이용해 스타트업들을 만든다면, 우리는 그 전까지 볼 수 없었던 잠재력들을 만날 수 있습니다. 믿을 수 없는 일들을 달성할 수 있습니다.

0:42

하지만 그렇게 스타트업이 훌륭하다면 왜 많은 사람들이 실패할까요? 그 점이 제가 알고 싶었던 겁니다. 저는 스타트업이 성공하기 위해 가장 중요한 점을 찾기 원했습니다.

0:51

그리고 체계적으로 연구해서 제가 그동안 지켜본 수많은 회사들로부터 얻은 직관과 연관되어 있을지 모를 잘못된 오해를 피하고자 했습니다.

0:59

이 연구를 원했던 이유는 12살때부터 저는 스타트업을 해왔기 때문입니다. 그 시기에 저는 버스정류장에서 사탕을 팔았고 고등학교 때는 태양 에너지 장치를 만들었습니다. 대학교 시기에는 스피커를 만들었습니다. 대학 졸업 이후에 저는 소프트웨어 회사를 창업했습니다. 20년 전에는 아이디어랩을 시도했고 그 이후로 저는 100개가 넘는 회사를 창업했습니다. 많은 성공과 실패가 있었습니다. 우리는 실패로부터 많은 것을 배웠습니다.

1:22

저는 어떤 요소들이 회사의 성공과 실패를 좌우하는지 연구했습니다. 5가지 요소를 찾았습니다. 첫번째는 아이디어 입니다. 저는 아이디어가 모든것이라고 생각했었습니다. 제가 회사 이름을 아이디어랩이라고 지은 것만 봐도 짐작하실 수 있으실겁니다. 하지만 시간이 흐르고 아마도 팀과 실행력, 적응력 등이 아이디어보다 더 중요하지 않을까 생각했습니다.

1:45

저는 TED 무대에서 타이슨(복싱 선수)를 언급하게 될 줄은 몰랐습니다. 그는 이렇게 말했습니다. "모든사람은 계획이 있다. 그들이 얼굴 에 한방먹기 전까지는 말이지."(웃음) 그리고 저는 그 말이 사업에서도 적용된다고 생각합니다. 팀의 실행력은 고객에게 한방맞을 때 진가를 발휘합니다. 고객은 현실입니다. 그래서 저는 팀이 가장 중요한 요소라고 생각했습니다.

2:11

그리고 저는 비지니스 모델을 살펴봤습니다. 그 회사는 수익을 창출할 확실한 방법이 있습니까? 성공에 대해 가장 중요한 요소가 이 것일지도 모른다는 생각이 들었습니다.

2:20

그리고 저는 자금조달에 관심을 가졌습니다. 가끔씩 회사들은 엄청난 자금을 조달합니다. 이 것이 가장 중요한 요소일까요?

2:26

그리고 타이밍이라는 요소는 빼놓을 수 없습니다. 아이디어 방식이 너무 시대를 앞지른건가요? 그래서 우리는 세계를 교육해야 하는 것일까요? 딱 그런걸까요? 아니면 이미 늦어서 너무 많은 경쟁자들이 있는 것일까요?

2:37

그래서 저는 이 다섯가지 요소들을 많은 회사들에 적용해 지켜봤습니다. 저는 100여개의 아이디어랩 회사와 아이디어랩이 아닌 회사들을 지켜보고 연관성을 찾으려 노력했습니다.

2:48

먼저 아이디어 회사들 중에 최고의 5개 회사들 시티서치, 카스다이렉트, 고투, 넷제로, 티켓닷컴 최고의 성공을 거둔 회사들입니다. 최악의 5개 회사들 지닷컴, 인사이더 페이지스, 마이라이프, 데스크탑펙토리, 피플링크 많은 기대를 했지만 성공하지 못했죠.

3:05

저는 각각의 회사에 위의 다섯가지 요소들에 대한 평가를 하고 살펴봤습니다. 그리고 아이디어랩이 아닌 회사들 중 크게 성공한 케이스 에어비앤비, 인스타그램, 우버, 유투브, 그리고 링크드인

3:19

그리고 몇몇의 실패사례들 웹벤, 코즈모, 펫츠닷컴 플로즈, 프랜즈닷컴 이 회사들은 자금을 지원받았고 좋은 비지니스 모델을 가지고 있었지만 성공하지 못했습니다. 저는 이 모든 회사들의 성공과 실패에 어떤 요소가 가장 큰 영향을 주는지 살펴봤고 결과는 매우 놀라웠습니다.

3:36

가장 중요한 점은 타이밍이었습니다. 성공과 실패를 구분짓는 중요도가 42퍼센트였습니다. 팀과 실행력은 두번째 요소이고 아이디어는 아이디어의 차별화, 독창성은 3번째 였습니다.

3:50

이 결과가 절대적이지 않습니다만 그리고 아이디어가 중요하지 않다는 말도 아니지만 아이디어가 가장 중요한 요소가 아니라는 점이 놀라웠습니다. 좋은 타이밍에서는 조금 더 중요할 수도 있지만요

4:01

비지니스 모델과 자금조달에 대해서는 이치에 맞다고 생각했습니다. 비지니스 모델이 중요도가 낮은 이유는 그 요소 없이 사업을 시작할 수 있고 이후에 고객의 요구에 따라 추가할 수 있기 때문입니다. 자금조달에 대해서도 처음에 부족하다고 해도 점차 인정받으면 특히 오늘날 시대에는 자금조달하기가 매우 쉽기 때문입니다.

4:19

이제 제가 구체적인 사례에 대해서 말씀드리겠습니다. 모두들 알고있는 에어비엔비에 대해서 살펴보면 많은 훌륭한 투자자들이 회의적으로 생각했다는 점이 유명합니다. 왜냐면 그 사람들은 "누구도 외부인에게 자기집을 빌려주지 않을 것이다." 라고 여겼기 때문이죠. 물론, 잘못된 생각이었죠. 그것이 성공한 이유 중 하나는 좋은 비지니스 모델, 아이디어, 실행력은 별도로 생각하면 타이밍입니다.

4:41

그 회사는 장기 경기 불황속 사람들이 자금이 필요할 시기에 사업을 시작했기 때문입니다. 그 점이 사람들이 외부인에게 자기 집을 빌려주기 싫다는 단점을 상쇄한 것입니다.

4:50

우버의 경우에도 마찬가지 입니다. 우버가 출범했고 놀라운 회사와 비지니스 모델 실행력이 있었습니다. 하지만 타이밍이 완벽했습니다. 운전자들에게 매력적으로 보였죠. 운전자들은 추가적인 수입이 필요했고 그 점이 아주 중요했습니다.

5:02

초창기 성공 회사인 시티서치는 사람들의 웹페이지 수요시기에 등장했고 1998년 TED에서 발표한 고투닷컴은 회사들이 트래픽 원가절감 방법을 찾고 있을때 출범했습니다. 우리는 아이디어가 훌륭하다고 말했지만 실제로 타이밍이 훨씬 더 중요했습니다. 그리고 실패 케이스들을 보면 우리가 온라인 엔터테인먼트 회사인 지닷컴을 시작했을 때 굉장히 들떠있었습니다. 충분한 자금, 좋은 비지니스 모델이 있었고 유명한 할리우드 탤런트와도 계약했습니다. 하지만 1990-2000년대 인터넷 보급률은 상당히 낮았고 비디오 컨텐츠를 소비하기 어려운 여건이었습니다. 서비스를 이용하기 위해 모든 복잡한 프로그램을 설치해야 했습니다. 결국 회사는 2003년에 문을 닫았습니다.

5:38

정확히 2년 후에 그 코덱 문제는 아도브 플래쉬에 의해 해결됬고 미국에서 인터넷 보급률도 50퍼센트를 넘었습니다. 유투브가 딱 좋은 시기에 등장했죠. 휼륭한 생각이었고 타이밍이 맞아떨어졌죠. 사실, 유투브가 서비스를 시작했을 때 비지니스 모델이 없었습니다. 실제로 서비스가 실행될지도 불투명했죠. 하지만 타이밍이 모든 것을 해결했습니다.

5:58

요약하면, 실행력은 굉장히 중요합니다. 아이디어도 마찬가지 입니다. 하지만 타이밍이 모든 것을 결정합니다. 타이밍을 측정하기 위한 최선은 당신이 제공하고자 하는 것에 대해 소비자들이 충분한 준비가 되어있는지 알아보는 것입니다. 정말 솔직해지자면 현실을 부정하면 안됩니다. 여러분이 사랑하는 것은 무조건 추진하고 싶을 것입니다. 하지만 타이밍에 대해서 매우 매우 객관적으로 검토해야 합니다.

6:22

이미 언급했듯이 저는 스타트업이 세상에 큰 기여를 할 것이라고 생각합니다. 저는 이 몇몇의 연구결과가 스타트업을 시작하려는 사람들에게 조금이나마 도움이 되고 그동안 세상에 존재하지 못했던 것을 발표해 세상을 발전시키기를 바랍니다. 잘 들어주셔서 매우 감사합니다. (박수)


부분


0:11

I'm really excited to share with you some findings that really surprise me about what makes companies succeed the most, what factors actually matter the most for startup success.


0:11

저는 오늘 여러분들과 함께 스타트업의 성공에 가장 중요한 요소가 무엇인지 무엇이 회사를 성공하게 도와주는지에 대한 몇가지 놀라운 연구조사들을 공유하고자 합니다.


0:24

I believe that the startup organization is one of the greatest forms to make the world a better place. If you take a group of people with the right equity incentives and organize them in a startup, you can unlock human potential in a way never before possible. You get them to achieve unbelievable things.

0:24

저는 스타트업이 이 세상을 발전시킬 형태 중 하나라고 믿습니다. 만약 우리가 올바른 성과급 시스템을 이용해 스타트업들을 만든다면, 우리는 그 전까지 볼 수 없었던 잠재력들을 만날 수 있습니다. 믿을 수 없는 일들을 달성할 수 있습니다.



0:42

But if the startup organization is so great, why do so many fail? That's what I wanted to find out. I wanted to find out what actually matters most for startup success.

0:42

하지만 그렇게 스타트업이 훌륭하다면 왜 많은 사람들이 실패할까요? 그 점이 제가 알고 싶었던 겁니다. 저는 스타트업이 성공하기 위해 가장 중요한 점을 찾기 원했습니다.



0:51

And I wanted to try to be systematic about it, avoid some of my instincts and maybe misperceptions I have from so many companies I've seen over the years.

0:51

그리고 체계적으로 연구해서 제가 그동안 지켜본 수많은 회사들로부터 얻은 직관과 연관되어 있을지 모를 잘못된 오해를 피하고자 했습니다.



0:59

I wanted to know this because I've been starting businesses since I was 12 years old when I sold candy at the bus stop in junior high school, to high school, when I made solar energy devices, to college, when I made loudspeakers. And when I graduated from college, I started software companies. And 20 years ago, I started Idealab, and in the last 20 years, we started more than 100 companies, many successes, and many big failures. We learned a lot from those failures.

0:59

이 연구를 원했던 이유는 12살때부터 저는 스타트업을 해왔기 때문입니다. 그 시기에 저는 버스정류장에서 사탕을 팔았고 고등학교 때는 태양 에너지 장치를 만들었습니다. 대학교 시기에는 스피커를 만들었습니다. 대학 졸업 이후에 저는 소프트웨어 회사를 창업했습니다. 20년 전에는 아이디어랩을 시도했고 그 이후로 저는 100개가 넘는 회사를 창업했습니다. 많은 성공과 실패가 있었습니다. 우리는 실패로부터 많은 것을 배웠습니다.



1:22

So I tried to look across what factors accounted the most for company success and failure. So I looked at these five. First, the idea. I used to think that the idea was everything. I named my company Idealab for how much I worship the "aha!" moment when you first come up with the idea. But then over time, I came to think that maybe the team, the execution, adaptability, that mattered even more than the idea.

1:22

저는 어떤 요소들이 회사의 성공과 실패를 좌우하는지 연구했습니다. 5가지 요소를 찾았습니다. 첫번째는 아이디어 입니다. 저는 아이디어가 모든것이라고 생각했었습니다. 제가 회사 이름을 아이디어랩이라고 지은 것만 봐도 짐작하실 수 있으실겁니다. 하지만 시간이 흐르고 아마도 팀과 실행력, 적응력 등이 아이디어보다 더 중요하지 않을까 생각했습니다.



1:45

I never thought I'd be quoting boxer Mike Tyson on the TED stage, but he once said, "Everybody has a plan, until they get punched in the face." (Laughter) And I think that's so true about business as well. So much about a team's execution is its ability to adapt to getting punched in the face by the customer. The customer is the true reality. And that's why I came to think that the team maybe was the most important thing.

1:45

저는 TED 무대에서 타이슨(복싱 선수)를 언급하게 될 줄은 몰랐습니다. 그는 이렇게 말했습니다. "모든사람은 계획이 있다. 그들이 얼굴 에 한방먹기 전까지는 말이지."(웃음) 그리고 저는 그 말이 사업에서도 적용된다고 생각합니다. 팀의 실행력은 고객에게 한방맞을 때 진가를 발휘합니다. 고객은 현실입니다. 그래서 저는 팀이 가장 중요한 요소라고 생각했습니다.



2:11

Then I started looking at the business model. Does the company have a very clear path generating customer revenues? That started rising to the top in my thinking about maybe what mattered most for success.

2:11

그리고 저는 비지니스 모델을 살펴봤습니다. 그 회사는 수익을 창출할 확실한 방법이 있습니까? 성공에 대해 가장 중요한 요소가 이 것일지도 모른다는 생각이 들었습니다.


2:20

Then I looked at the funding. Sometimes companies received intense amounts of funding. Maybe that's the most important thing?

2:20

그리고 저는 자금조달에 관심을 가졌습니다. 가끔씩 회사들은 엄청난 자금을 조달합니다. 이 것이 가장 중요한 요소일까요?


2:26

And then of course, the timing. Is the idea way too early and the world's not ready for it? Is it early, as in, you're in advance and you have to educate the world? Is it just right? Or is it too late, and there's already too many competitors?

2:26

그리고 타이밍이라는 요소는 빼놓을 수 없습니다. 아이디어 방식이 너무 시대를 앞지른건가요? 그래서 우리는 세계를 교육해야 하는 것일까요? 딱 그런걸까요? 아니면 이미 늦어서 너무 많은 경쟁자들이 있는 것일까요?



2:38

So I tried to look very carefully at these five factors across many companies. And I looked across all 100 Idealab companies, and 100 non-Idealab companies to try and come up with something scientific about it.

2:37

그래서 저는 이 다섯가지 요소들을 많은 회사들에 적용해 지켜봤습니다. 저는 100여개의 아이디어랩 회사와 아이디어랩이 아닌 회사들을 지켜보고 연관성을 찾으려 노력했습니다.



2:48

So first, on these Idealab companies, the top five companies ? Citysearch, CarsDirect, GoTo, NetZero, Tickets.com ? those all became billion-dollar successes. And the five companies on the bottom ? Z.com, Insider Pages, MyLife, Desktop Factory, Peoplelink ? we all had high hopes for, but didn't succeed.

2:48

먼저 아이디어 회사들 중에 최고의 5개 회사들 시티서치, 카스다이렉트, 고투, 넷제로, 티켓닷컴 최고의 성공을 거둔 회사들입니다. 최악의 5개 회사들 지닷컴, 인사이더 페이지스, 마이라이프, 데스크탑펙토리, 피플링크 많은 기대를 했지만 성공하지 못했죠.


3:05

So I tried to rank across all of those attributes how I felt those companies scored on each of those dimensions. And then for non-Idealab companies, I looked at wild successes, like Airbnb and Instagram and Uber and Youtube and LinkedIn.

3:05

저는 각각의 회사에 위의 다섯가지 요소들에 대한 평가를 하고 살펴봤습니다. 그리고 아이디어랩이 아닌 회사들 중 크게 성공한 케이스 에어비앤비, 인스타그램, 우버, 유투브, 그리고 링크드인


3:19

And some failures: Webvan, Kozmo, Pets.com Flooz and Friendster. The bottom companies had intense funding, they even had business models in some cases, but they didn't succeed. I tried to look at what factors actually accounted the most for success and failure across all of these companies, and the results really surprised me.

3:19

그리고 몇몇의 실패사례들 웹벤, 코즈모, 펫츠닷컴 플로즈, 프랜즈닷컴 이 회사들은 자금을 지원받았고 좋은 비지니스 모델을 가지고 있었지만 성공하지 못했습니다. 저는 이 모든 회사들의 성공과 실패에 어떤 요소가 가장 큰 영향을 주는지 살펴봤고 결과는 매우 놀라웠습니다.


3:36

The number one thing was timing. Timing accounted for 42 percent of the difference between success and failure. Team and execution came in second, and the idea, the differentiability of the idea, the uniqueness of the idea, that actually came in third.

3:36

가장 중요한 점은 타이밍이었습니다. 성공과 실패를 구분짓는 중요도가 42퍼센트였습니다. 팀과 실행력은 두번째 요소이고 아이디어는 아이디어의 차별화, 독창성은 3번째 였습니다.


3:50

Now, this isn't absolutely definitive, it's not to say that the idea isn't important, but it very much surprised me that the idea wasn't the most important thing. Sometimes it mattered more when it was actually timed.

3:50

이 결과가 절대적이지 않습니다만 그리고 아이디어가 중요하지 않다는 말도 아니지만 아이디어가 가장 중요한 요소가 아니라는 점이 놀라웠습니다. 좋은 타이밍에서는 조금 더 중요할 수도 있지만요


4:01

The last two, business model and funding, made sense to me actually. I think business model makes sense to be that low because you can start out without a business model and add one later if your customers are demanding what you're creating. And funding, I think as well, if you're underfunded at first but you're gaining traction, especially in today's age, it's very, very easy to get intense funding.

4:01

비지니스 모델과 자금조달에 대해서는 이치에 맞다고 생각했습니다. 비지니스 모델이 중요도가 낮은 이유는 그 요소 없이 사업을 시작할 수 있고 이후에 고객의 요구에 따라 추가할 수 있기 때문입니다. 자금조달에 대해서도 처음에 부족하다고 해도 점차 인정받으면 특히 오늘날 시대에는 자금조달하기가 매우 쉽기 때문입니다.


4:20

So now let me give you some specific examples about each of these. So take a wild success like Airbnb that everybody knows about. Well, that company was famously passed on by many smart investors because people thought, "No one's going to rent out a space in their home to a stranger." Of course, people proved that wrong. But one of the reasons it succeeded, aside from a good business model, a good idea, great execution, is the timing.

4:19

이제 제가 구체적인 사례에 대해서 말씀드리겠습니다. 모두들 알고있는 에어비엔비에 대해서 살펴보면 많은 훌륭한 투자자들이 회의적으로 생각했다는 점이 유명합니다. 왜냐면 그 사람들은 "누구도 외부인에게 자기집을 빌려주지 않을 것이다." 라고 여겼기 때문이죠. 물론, 잘못된 생각이었죠. 그것이 성공한 이유 중 하나는 좋은 비지니스 모델, 아이디어, 실행력은 별도로 생각하면 타이밍입니다.


4:41

That company came out right during the height of the recession when people really needed extra money, and that maybe helped people overcome their objection to renting out their own home to a stranger.

4:41

그 회사는 장기 경기 불황속 사람들이 자금이 필요할 시기에 사업을 시작했기 때문입니다. 그 점이 사람들이 외부인에게 자기 집을 빌려주기 싫다는 단점을 상쇄한 것입니다.


4:50

Same thing with Uber. Uber came out, incredible company, incredible business model, great execution, too. But the timing was so perfect for their need to get drivers into the system. Drivers were looking for extra money; it was very, very important.

4:50

우버의 경우에도 마찬가지 입니다. 우버가 출범했고 놀라운 회사와 비지니스 모델 실행력이 있었습니다. 하지만 타이밍이 완벽했습니다. 운전자들에게 매력적으로 보였죠. 운전자들은 추가적인 수입이 필요했고 그 점이 아주 중요했습니다.


5:02

Some of our early successes, Citysearch, came out when people needed web pages. GoTo.com, which we announced actually at TED in 1998, was when companies were looking for cost-effective ways to get traffic. We thought the idea was so great, but actually, the timing was probably maybe more important. And then some of our failures. We started a company called Z.com, it was an online entertainment company. We were so excited about it ? we raised enough money, we had a great business model, we even signed incredibly great Hollywood talent to join the company. But broadband penetration was too low in 1999-2000. It was too hard to watch video content online, you had to put codecs in your browser and do all this stuff, and the company eventually went out of business in 2003.

5:02

초창기 성공 회사인 시티서치는 사람들의 웹페이지 수요시기에 등장했고 1998년 TED에서 발표한 고투닷컴은 회사들이 트래픽 원가절감 방법을 찾고 있을때 출범했습니다. 우리는 아이디어가 훌륭하다고 말했지만 실제로 타이밍이 훨씬 더 중요했습니다. 그리고 실패 케이스들을 보면 우리가 온라인 엔터테인먼트 회사인 지닷컴을 시작했을 때 굉장히 들떠있었습니다. 충분한 자금, 좋은 비지니스 모델이 있었고 유명한 할리우드 탤런트와도 계약했습니다. 하지만 1990-2000년대 인터넷 보급률은 상당히 낮았고 비디오 컨텐츠를 소비하기 어려운 여건이었습니다. 서비스를 이용하기 위해 모든 복잡한 프로그램을 설치해야 했습니다. 결국 회사는 2003년에 문을 닫았습니다.


5:38

Just two years later, when the codec problem was solved by Adobe Flash and when broadband penetration crossed 50 percent in America, YouTube was perfectly timed. Great idea, but unbelievable timing. In fact, YouTube didn't even have a business model when it first started. It wasn't even certain that that would work out. But that was beautifully, beautifully timed.

5:38

정확히 2년 후에 그 코덱 문제는 아도브 플래쉬에 의해 해결됬고 미국에서 인터넷 보급률도 50퍼센트를 넘었습니다. 유투브가 딱 좋은 시기에 등장했죠. 휼륭한 생각이었고 타이밍이 맞아떨어졌죠. 사실, 유투브가 서비스를 시작했을 때 비지니스 모델이 없었습니다. 실제로 서비스가 실행될지도 불투명했죠. 하지만 타이밍이 모든 것을 해결했습니다.


5:58

So what I would say, in summary, is execution definitely matters a lot. The idea matters a lot. But timing might matter even more. And the best way to really assess timing is to really look at whether consumers are really ready for what you have to offer them. And to be really, really honest about it, not be in denial about any results that you see, because if you have something you love, you want to push it forward, but you have to be very, very honest about that factor on timing.

5:58

요약하면, 실행력은 굉장히 중요합니다. 아이디어도 마찬가지 입니다. 하지만 타이밍이 모든 것을 결정합니다. 타이밍을 측정하기 위한 최선은 당신이 제공하고자 하는 것에 대해 소비자들이 충분한 준비가 되어있는지 알아보는 것입니다. 정말 솔직해지자면 현실을 부정하면 안됩니다. 여러분이 사랑하는 것은 무조건 추진하고 싶을 것입니다. 하지만 타이밍에 대해서 매우 매우 객관적으로 검토해야 합니다.


6:22

As I said earlier, I think startups can change the world and make the world a better place. I hope some of these insights can maybe help you have a slightly higher success ratio, and thus make something great come to the world that wouldn't have happened otherwise.

6:34

Thank you very much, you've been a great audience.

6:36

(Applause)


6:22

이미 언급했듯이 저는 스타트업이 세상에 큰 기여를 할 것이라고 생각합니다. 저는 이 몇몇의 연구결과가 스타트업을 시작하려는 사람들에게 조금이나마 도움이 되고 그동안 세상에 존재하지 못했던 것을 발표해 세상을 발전시키기를 바랍니다. 잘 들어주셔서 매우 감사합니다. (박수)

 



반응형

댓글0